Why do adults speak strangely to infants?
Infant directed speech or “Mother-ese” as it’s sometimes known, describes the spontaneous change in the speech of adults when communicating with children. Voices rise in pitch and slow down, while words become linguistically simpler, exaggerated and repetitive. “Mother-ese” is quite clearly distinct from normal speech, but why do adults feel the need to change so abruptly when confronted with an infant? 
Infants show a clear predisposition for “Mother-ese”, and the modified language is beneficial to development. When given a choice, infants prefer listening to infant directed speech and are more likely to respond to similar sounds (with high pitch and a slow tempo). Infants also show improved learning when taught using infant directed speech, as opposed to adult appropriate speech. In conclusion, “Mother-ese” is a useful tool for parents to gain their child’s attention and facilitate their learning. 

Why do adults speak strangely to infants?

Infant directed speech or “Mother-ese” as it’s sometimes known, describes the spontaneous change in the speech of adults when communicating with children. Voices rise in pitch and slow down, while words become linguistically simpler, exaggerated and repetitive. “Mother-ese” is quite clearly distinct from normal speech, but why do adults feel the need to change so abruptly when confronted with an infant? 

Infants show a clear predisposition for “Mother-ese”, and the modified language is beneficial to development. When given a choice, infants prefer listening to infant directed speech and are more likely to respond to similar sounds (with high pitch and a slow tempo). Infants also show improved learning when taught using infant directed speech, as opposed to adult appropriate speech. In conclusion, “Mother-ese” is a useful tool for parents to gain their child’s attention and facilitate their learning. 

Peppermint’s cool and refreshing taste provides a welcome relief on warm days. The pleasant, cooling sensation associated with mojitos, mint tea and mentos is not simply imagination, but an intriguing illusion which plays on the mechanics of the brain. 
Temperature is detected by nerve endings in our skin, which projects the information to specialised warmth receptors in the brain. The temperature we feel is determined by which receptors are activated. However, these receptors can be tricked. Menthol, a chemical found in mint leaves, stimulates cold receptors, creating a feeling of coolness.
As a result, the brain responds as if you’re stepping into the shade every time you take a sip of mint tea.

Peppermint’s cool and refreshing taste provides a welcome relief on warm days. The pleasant, cooling sensation associated with mojitos, mint tea and mentos is not simply imagination, but an intriguing illusion which plays on the mechanics of the brain. 

Temperature is detected by nerve endings in our skin, which projects the information to specialised warmth receptors in the brain. The temperature we feel is determined by which receptors are activated. However, these receptors can be tricked. Menthol, a chemical found in mint leaves, stimulates cold receptors, creating a feeling of coolness.

As a result, the brain responds as if you’re stepping into the shade every time you take a sip of mint tea.

Man’s Best Friend
Dogs or cats? The mere mention of this question sparks off the most enraged and volatile of arguments. Now, thanks to recent research, dog lovers can add a new weapon to their arsenal: empathy.
Eleven dogs were trained to lie in an MRI scanner while a variety of sounds were played. More activity was found in the dog’s brains when listening to human voices, rather than sounds of objects like cars or whistles. Particularly emotional sounds, like crying and laughter, produced activity in the same region of the auditory cortex of both humans and dogs.
Any dog owner will tell you of the uncanny ability to understand human emotion that our four-legged friends seem to possess.These findings, while not absolute evidence of empathy in man’s best friend, provide the first insights into the biological mechanisms underlying that mysterious connection.
Image courtesy of Borbala Ferenczy.

Man’s Best Friend

Dogs or cats? The mere mention of this question sparks off the most enraged and volatile of arguments. Now, thanks to recent research, dog lovers can add a new weapon to their arsenal: empathy.

Eleven dogs were trained to lie in an MRI scanner while a variety of sounds were played. More activity was found in the dog’s brains when listening to human voices, rather than sounds of objects like cars or whistles. Particularly emotional sounds, like crying and laughter, produced activity in the same region of the auditory cortex of both humans and dogs.

Any dog owner will tell you of the uncanny ability to understand human emotion that our four-legged friends seem to possess.These findings, while not absolute evidence of empathy in man’s best friend, provide the first insights into the biological mechanisms underlying that mysterious connection.

Image courtesy of Borbala Ferenczy.

thisistheverge
thisistheverge:

Dreamcasters: how video games alter our subconscious

A fascinating article exploring the link between the virtual imaginary worlds of video games and the biological imaginary worlds that we experience in dreams. Lucid dreaming, a state where the dreamer is aware of being in a dream, is more common in gamers, possibly because of their extensive experience of made-up worlds.

thisistheverge:

Dreamcasters: how video games alter our subconscious

A fascinating article exploring the link between the virtual imaginary worlds of video games and the biological imaginary worlds that we experience in dreams. Lucid dreaming, a state where the dreamer is aware of being in a dream, is more common in gamers, possibly because of their extensive experience of made-up worlds.

shambling-after

shambling-after:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Taking a look at depression.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Accepting that you have depression is difficult, even though it’s cliché, realising that you have a problem is the first step to solving it.

If you’re currently struggling and are becoming worried, I’d recommend watching youtuber TomSka’s video about his difficult realisation that he had depression: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ds8sSeJtwYs

Caffeine Boosts Memory
Students all around the world use coffee and energy drinks to stay awake through all-night revision sessions, but new research from John Hopkins University suggests that caffeine consumption may be more effective after studying rather than before.
Dr. Michael Yassa and colleagues asked participants to memorise a set of images. They were then given either a caffeine pill or a placebo (an identical pill with no caffeine). A second set of pictures were presented the following day, which included some images shown previously and some that were different, but similar, to the first set. Usually, the similarity of the new pictures to the older ones makes it difficult to realise that they are new. The caffeine group were better at identifying these similar pictures as new than the placebo group, demonstrating that consuming caffeine enhanced their memory of the first set of images.
Don’t start downing cups of coffee after lectures though; the researchers found that 200 milligrams of caffeine was the optimum amount to improve memory. That’s about half as much caffeine as in a Starbucks “venti” sized coffee. Any more than that caused side effects, such as headaches, which prevented the enhancement in memory.
Image Courtesy of Hallbadorn on Flickr.

Caffeine Boosts Memory

Students all around the world use coffee and energy drinks to stay awake through all-night revision sessions, but new research from John Hopkins University suggests that caffeine consumption may be more effective after studying rather than before.

Dr. Michael Yassa and colleagues asked participants to memorise a set of images. They were then given either a caffeine pill or a placebo (an identical pill with no caffeine). A second set of pictures were presented the following day, which included some images shown previously and some that were different, but similar, to the first set. Usually, the similarity of the new pictures to the older ones makes it difficult to realise that they are new. The caffeine group were better at identifying these similar pictures as new than the placebo group, demonstrating that consuming caffeine enhanced their memory of the first set of images.

Don’t start downing cups of coffee after lectures though; the researchers found that 200 milligrams of caffeine was the optimum amount to improve memory. That’s about half as much caffeine as in a Starbucks “venti” sized coffee. Any more than that caused side effects, such as headaches, which prevented the enhancement in memory.

Image Courtesy of Hallbadorn on Flickr.

Are you ticklish? 
As all people with older siblings know, a few seconds of well-placed tickling can reduce a person to a laughing, gasping wreck. Ticklish areas (neck, underarms, feet) typically contain more nerve endings than normal. Usually responsible for detecting pain or temperature changes, a light touch to these overly sensitive areas will send signals to the pleasure areas of the brain, evoking an uncontrollable laughter response.
While it seems like an odd weakness for us to have, ticklishness evolved as a way for young children to practice their self-defence skills. Some of the most ticklish areas are also the most vulnerable. For example, the neck houses the trachea which delivers air to the lungs and the underarms contain several vital arteries. Tickle fights offer children a relatively safe and enjoyable training ground to learn to protect these key areas instinctively in actual combat situations, while encouraging early bonding between family and friends at the same time.
But why is it impossible to tickle oneself? Well the brain knows that it is your own movements producing the tickling sensation, so it ignores the resulting feelings of pleasure. This makes sense if tickling is a method of learning self-defence. What would be the point in learning to protect from oneself?
Image Courtesy of Sham Hardy on Flickr.

Are you ticklish?

As all people with older siblings know, a few seconds of well-placed tickling can reduce a person to a laughing, gasping wreck. Ticklish areas (neck, underarms, feet) typically contain more nerve endings than normal. Usually responsible for detecting pain or temperature changes, a light touch to these overly sensitive areas will send signals to the pleasure areas of the brain, evoking an uncontrollable laughter response.

While it seems like an odd weakness for us to have, ticklishness evolved as a way for young children to practice their self-defence skills. Some of the most ticklish areas are also the most vulnerable. For example, the neck houses the trachea which delivers air to the lungs and the underarms contain several vital arteries. Tickle fights offer children a relatively safe and enjoyable training ground to learn to protect these key areas instinctively in actual combat situations, while encouraging early bonding between family and friends at the same time.

But why is it impossible to tickle oneself? Well the brain knows that it is your own movements producing the tickling sensation, so it ignores the resulting feelings of pleasure. This makes sense if tickling is a method of learning self-defence. What would be the point in learning to protect from oneself?

Image Courtesy of Sham Hardy on Flickr.

zerostatereflex

zerostatereflex:

"In 2005, artist Jennifer Kanary’s sister-in-law committed suicide while suffering from a psychotic episode. This event led Jennifer to develop Labyrinth Psychotica, an experience designed to give people more insight into how it feels to suffer through psychosis."

This is a fantastic use of technology to teach empathy. The Oculus Rift, in it’s final form, will no doubt be able to help teach and treat people with mental illness.

My heart goes out to people suffering with mental illness.